The Star Wars in “Star Wars”

“Rogue One” takes the worldwide phenomena, entitled Star Wars, and serves up exactly what the title describes better than any other episode has. The final 50 minutes of the film is absolute pure adrenaline, spreading several sequences of space battles out evenly and thickly across the vast sandbox of outer-space.

The rebel X-Wing’s spin through the black, starry backgrounds like whirring darts, while the evil TIE fighters dash confidently after the rebels like submarines on auto-pilot.

The TIE fighters are the unflinching first line of the Imperial’s heavily-equipped military, while the rebels are scrapping more urgently for their lives than for the overall cause. The sense of duty can truly be felt extemporaneously through the genial, average-looking faces of the rebel pilots. Gareth Edwards cuts to the orange-clad pilots in the same manner in which George Lucas did almost 40 years ago.

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Edwards builds a feeling of camaraderie, making the fall and destruction of the pilots ever the more devastating. The characters are always trudging up the hill, always facing some sort of strategic disadvantage. We feel for them as a pack of truly unrelenting underdogs.

J.J. Abrams, on the other hand, must have enjoyed playing with his Jedi action figures a lot more than he did with his toy X-Wing models as a young fan. The Force Awakens had a lot to juggle and accomplish in a single 2 hour movie, and it did so fairly successfully. The space battles, however, had no sense of urgency, tension, or excitement.

What makes it all the worse for Abrams is the fact that he had introduced his prodigy pilot, Poe Dameron, as a prominent character in The Force Awakens universe. In the end, Abrams doesn’t put Dameron in a great position to shine, despite Oscar Isaac being a top-notch actor. It’s forgivable, or at least understandable, though, given that Abrams’ job was to slide wet cement under the stepping stones of the franchises’ future sequels.

Poe Dam

Their is nothing workman-like about Poe Dameron. He comes off as surefire and confident. He doesn’t look as vulnerable or homespun as the other rebel pilots. These pilots are essentially flying through dangerous, highly-weaponized atmospheres within the confines of jerky metallic cans. It’s not a job that offers very many long-term benefits other than life insurance, maybe.

The rebel fleet is commonly used as an ex machina plot device, a last resort to sweep in and clean up any leftover storm troopers. They are efficient, skilled professionals, trained like neurosurgeons to locate, maneuver, and eliminate waves of Imperial garrisons.

Luke Skywalker was the ultimate example of a surgical and precise pilot, squeezing his way through narrow tunnels in the Death Star’s hull, searching for the weak chink in the weapon’s armor.

In Rogue One, one of the rebel X-Wings is literally ordered to act as a shield to the rebels on the ground, hovering over the running soldiers of the resistance as if they were some sort of intergalactic secret service agents.

Rebel Shield 1
Rebel resistance pushing through Imperial-controlled beach.
rebel shield 2
Rebel ship hovers over to shield rebel soldiers on the beach.
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