The Amazing Spider-Man reboot has of course caused a hoopla of ‘what?’ and confusion, since only several years ago the franchise had concluded. The first Spider-Man was Sam Raimi’s vehicle, a wondrous display of set-pieces and talent: But with the new Spider-Man, we see a new look, tone, and feeling for the character. Here, Peter Parker has the on-the-fringe personality that is so attracting in the movies: Avenger flicks have made huge gross amounts in movie history. His parents left him at a young age with his Uncle Ben, played with the old-style charm of Martin Sheen, and Aunt May. Although It distinctly establishes its own uniqueness, there are some scenes that seem strangely similar.

I liked the fact that Spider-Man had to create, spindle shall we say, his own webs. It put a limitation to his tower-swinging capabilities; after all, you can’t be heroic without an Achilles heel. It has a true effect of trying to fit-in with a modern-retelling; the characters use smart-phones and Bing search engines, but the drama always remains in the neatly-wound realm of superhero flicks. When Peter comes home, late at night, bloody in the face, the Aunt assumes nothing, or seems not to; and right after Peter is bit, he comes home in a jittery sweat, eating and catching flies between two fingers: Why couldn’t Uncle Ben ask him if he was on coke? These are domestic people, let’s show it that way.

Garfield’s Parker is a lot more narcissistic with his own feelings, partly because more tragedy is involved in this Spider-Man. There are many scenes where he is teary-eyed, and easily visible behind his dusty, bloody face. He needs Gwen Stacy, played by Emma Stone, and at first it seems to be a Romeo and Juliet story, only the Montagues end up dieing instead of the children. There scenes have a vibrant, muted expression, and an innocence that is too far gone in Peter’s life.

The villain in The Amazing Spider-Man is a bit unusual. We don’t necessarily have that subjection of hatred towards him like most superhero flicks; he is a brilliant scientist with a desire to change his life and handicap, and even the lives of others. Though, after recording himself deep in the sewers, we see that he is not only turning into a reptile, but also a ideological mess; he has the sort of impenetrable mindset that insists on helping the world by turning them all into lizards like him. A brooding tale of deceit, responsibility,  and family history.

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