8/10

Quentin Tarantino packs a punch like usual with his Nazi slap-in-the-face, Inglourious Bastards, showing an organized, street-like Jewish rebellion: The bastards. A crew of Nazi killers who remove the German’s scalps for treasure, and wipe out whole scouting parties to the point of making a name for themselves amongst the Nazis. It’s well acted all around, and rightfully won Christoph Waltz an Oscar for his role as a cruel German officer, or ‘The Jew Hunter’ and features a very dense plot, with several story-lines weaving into one, like the Director did in one of his earlier films, ‘Pulp Fiction’.

The movie is somewhat exploitative in the way it takes a terrible event in history and turns it into a showcase and excuse for being terribly violent; yet, its rewarding in more ways than this, and Jewish folk are a bit to modest to make a movie so audacious: Roman Polanski making this film would be much different than Tarantino making it, and people no doubt can make the distinction. Lt. Aldo Rain (Brad Pitt), is leading a team of Jew-recruits into the heart of Germany; their scenes are the most exciting, like a scene taking place at a bar where a member of the crew is trying to fit in amongst a table of hearty German officers. The result is not a gentle tip of the hat and a salutation, the bastards send bullets in all possible directions. This leaves a famous German actress, alive but wounded in the leg,  for their taking: they use her as sabotage to access a party for the Fuhrer, later in the film.

A young Jewish girl, Bridget Von Hammersmark, who escaped Lieutenant Hans earlier in the film, becomes a theater owner at a fairly young age, having inherited it, and becomes the attraction of a young and famous German soldier, who, as a a hiding Jew, she internally could never love. He’s more than just a soldier, too: he is a star in a new German film where he solely sits at the top of a clock-tower and shoots down Jews below. The fuhrer loves it, but Bridget comes up with a plan to show the Germans their cruelty, a down-pouring of beautiful revenge: Let the theater on fire. And with the easily combustible film of that era, it would not be difficult for it to actually happen.

The film is a fantastic genre-blend of action, violence, and alternate history, featuring typically memorable characters from Tarantino, some hypnotic scenes, and an all around entertaining flick: Inglourious Bastards is far from a disappointment from Tarantino.

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