8/10

The Dark Knight, directed by Christopher Nolan, is a despairing door into a city of madness and corruption; The Joker, played with enigmatic gesture by Heath Ledger, has one thing planned only: To turn Gotham city into crumbling dust. Christian Bale returns from the earlier entry, Batman Begins, as the Knight, and lives up to his corporate splendor as he did during his role in American Psycho, though they are very opposite. The film is an amazing feat in special effects and cinematic action, featuring some enthralling shots filmed in a Chicago-based tunnel and a philosophical tone.

Maggie Gyhlennal plays Rachael, who is split between her love of Harvey Dent, the intelligent district attorney, or her old friend Bruce Wayne. The relationship has the strained essence through out, and it’s conclusion is expressed in a way by the hands of the joker. Christopher Nolan and his brother Johnathan, a co-scriptwriter, packed the Dark Knight with philosophical dimensions: throughout the movie, the joker pokes at Batman by demanding he remove the mask, and when people die because Batman refuses, he feels it is his fault; yet, the wise Alfred reassures with the fact that he would kill people anyways. It’s in their nature and we must only focus on our own and its benefits.

Their is a mysterious, gangster-like element to the film, also: the five Italian crime families are introduced, and Batman goes to them to find information on the joker. The use of sub-plots makes a great effect, the gangsters, Rachael and Harvey, Jim Gordon, and even more, similar to Scorsese’s The Departed. It balances it all perfectly, each consequence of a character leading to another, good or bad. We live by our choices, Batman must know, and his choices need to be above himself and for the sake of Gotham; because if we sit down and look at personal choices, they are self-interested, neurotic (the joker), and disillusioned (Harvey Dent).  Though it all swings in accord with the Batman mythology, I did find The Joker’s ease in persuading Harvey Dent onto his side rather unrealistic; Dent, above all people, would be hard to pull onto one’s side: he is a defense-lawyer.  Why would he bend over a few dark sentiments from The Joker?

The Dark Knight is a huge bang in the blockbuster genre: It virtually re-defined the comic-book genre almost to the point of not calling it one: Noirish, cinematic, philosophical, and intelligent, The Dark Knight is an entertaining benchmark in dark science-fiction.

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